0 to 12 V x 1A Transistor Adjustable Power Supply (ART554E)

Here is a simple source, for the benchwork, which can be assembled even with scrap components and is ideal for the beginner maker. The transistor and the transformer are examples of components which can be used from disused devices.

This power supply can provide adjustable output voltages between 0 and 12 V approximately, with a maximum current of 1 A, being ideal for powering projects under development or testing on a benchwork. In this source, we use a transistor as a serial regulator of the output voltage whose reference is provided by a zener diode.

The potentiometer adjusts the portion of the zener diode voltage to be applied to the transistor and thus the output voltage. A transformer with a secondary of less than 1 A (500 mA or 800 mA, for example) can be used, but this will become the maximum current supplied by the source.

In Figure 1, we have the complete diagram of this source.

 

Figure 1 - Complete diagram of the 0 to 12 V supply
Figure 1 - Complete diagram of the 0 to 12 V supply | Haga click en la imagen para ampliar |

 

 

Several techniques can be used for assembly such as terminal bridge, printed circuit board, etc. For beginners, as few components are used, we give you an idea of how to do the assembly using a small printed circuit board isolated in Figure 2.

 

Figure 2 - Printed circuit board for mounting the power supply
Figure 2 - Printed circuit board for mounting the power supply | Haga click en la imagen para ampliar |

 

 

When assembling, observe the polarity of the diodes and electrolytic capacitors, as well as the position of the transistor. For the voltage output, use red and black terminals in order to identify the positive and negative poles.

 

Test and Use

To monitor the output voltage, a 200 uA to 1 mA full scale analog indicator instrument can be used. This instrument can be calibrated based on the indications of a multimeter connected in parallel, as shown in Figure 3.

 

Figure 3 - Calibrating the output voltage indicator
Figure 3 - Calibrating the output voltage indicator

 

 

Adjust the source potentiometer to obtain an output voltage of 12 V, indicated by your multimeter. Then, adjust the trimpot in series with the instrument so that it goes to the end of the scale, where the 12 V voltage will be marked.

If the multimeter does not reach 12 V even with the pot open, check:

Whether the transformer actually supplies 15 V of the secondary.

Reduce the R1 value to 220 ohms.

 

If, when using the source, the transistor overheats and there is a sharp drop in the voltage indicated by the instrument at the output, it is a sign that the load requires a current greater than 1 A and cannot be powered by this source.

We also observed that this source does not have protection against shorts in its output, and the reader must take the utmost care with its use.

 

Q1 - TIP31 / A / B or C - Power NPN transistor

D1, D2 - 1N4002 - rectifier diodes

Z1 - 12V6 x 1 W - zener diode

LED1 - Common red LED

R1 - 470ohm x 1/8 W - resistor - red, yellow, brown

R2 - 2.2 kohm x 1/8 W - resistor - red, red, red

R3 - 10 kohm x 1/8 W - resistor - brown, black, orange

P1 - 4.7 kohm - linear or log potentiometer

P2 - 47 kohm - trimpot

C1 - 1 000 uF x 25 V - electrolytic capacitor

C2 - 10 uF x 16 V - electrolytic capacitor

C3 - 100 uF x 16 V - electrolytic capacitor

T1 - Transformer with primary according to the local and secondary network of 15 + 15 V x 1 A

M1 - 200 uA to 1 mA moving coil instrument

F1 - 500 mA - Fuse

S1 - Simple switch

J1, J2 - Red and black terminal blocks

 

Miscellaneous:

Printed circuit board or terminal bridge, power cable, heat radiator for the transistor, button for the potentiometer, fuse holder, mounting box, wires, solder, etc.

 

 


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